Tara Mehta, co-authors make dissemination and implementation recommendations to national and local NCATS leaders

This paper is really a call to action for local and national CTSA leadership. We are urging the integration of D&I sciences into CTSAs across the translational spectrum to speed up translation of science into practice in order to improve health and reduce health disparities.

Tara Mehta, PhD  |  Consultant, Community Engagement and Collaboration Core

Integrating dissemination and implementation sciences within Clinical and Translational Science Award programs to advance translational research: Recommendations to national and local leaders

Journal of Clinical and Translational Science, Volume 5, Issue 1
Published Online by Cambridge University Press

 

Abstract

The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) has defined translation as the process of turning observations into interventions that are adopted, sustained, and improve health. Translation must attend to research and community systems and context at multiple levels, and to key stakeholders. Dissemination and implementation (D&I) sciences are informed by an understanding of the critical role of people and systems in disseminating, adopting, and sustaining innovations within real-world settings. Thus, the D&I sciences provides a set of principles that can guide the translational work of Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) programs from basic research to public health. In this special communication, our cross-domain working group of the CTSA consortium, comprised of experts in methods and processes, workforce development, evaluation, stakeholder engagement, and D&I sciences, share a vision of how CTSAs can enhance translation across the translational spectrum through the integration of D&I sciences into the critical areas of methods and processes, workforce development, and evaluation. We propose a set of  recommendations for NCATS national and local leaders that are intended to move D&I sciences out of a position of unfamiliarity and ancillary value and into the core identity of who CTSAs are, how they think, and what they do, to advance translation and health.